New market house for Motalava

Motalava Market House funded by the Australian Aid

People from Motalava in the Banks islands now have a brand new market house for them to sell their food crops.

The Vt1 million market house was funded by Australia.

Report received from the Australian High Commission in Vanuatu confirmed that the market house in Motalava was funded by Australian aid through the Torba Skills Centre, which is part of the Australian-funded Vanuatu Skills Partnership.

The project was a partnership between the Torba Skills Centre the Vanuatu Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD) and the Motalava Area Council to support the community’s response to the dual crises of COVID-19 and TC Harold by supporting food security and economic livelihoods.

The project was initially requested by the Motalava Area Council, through the Area Administrator and the market house is regulated by the Motalava Area Administrator and a newly-established market house committee supported by Department of Agriculture and the Torba Skills Centre.

Australia’s Vt1.6 billion (AUD20 million) Tropical Cyclone Harold recovery package (announced in December 2020) will support the Government of Vanuatu’s Recovery Strategy 2020-2023.

It will help build back essential social services and critical infrastructure in communities heavily impacted by TC Harold.

This includes rebuilding schools and health facilities, improving water, sanitation and hygiene, and strengthening disaster preparedness and resilience.

Australia’s TC Harold Recovery Package builds on Australia’s initial contribution of Vt900 million for TC Harold response and early recovery which is supporting water, sanitation and hygiene facilities, assisting the Ministry of Education and Training to make emergency repairs to schools, and helping the Ministry of Health make emergency repairs to health facilities.

Australia, works in close collaboration with the Government of Vanuatu and coordinates with other donor-funded programs to improve the livelihood of the people of Vanuatu in remote areas.

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