Over 500 students and teachers, as well as members of the Gambule Primary and Secondary School community in Maewo are now able to access the Computer and Internet facility on the school premises.

With the establishment of an e-Library, students and teachers can access valuable educational and teaching resources.

Gambule school has been struggling with the challenge of providing sufficient textbooks and reading books to its students, therefore it is foreseen that the facility will help bridge this gap.

Furthermore, the schools can now access the Vanuatu Educational Management Information System (VEMIS), and will be able to feed information into the VEMIS database as required by the Ministry of Education and Training (MoET).

These benefits will also have a positive impact on the effectiveness and efficiency of decision making in relation to the school development. Gambule School has 250 secondary students, 250 primary students and 15 teachers altogether.

According to the Telecommunications Radiocommunications and Broadcasting Regulator (TRBR)’s Universal Access and Service coordinator, Hanson Waki, two programs were designed under the Universal Access Policy with the principle that schools can be hubs for community Internet access.

“These were the Computer Laboratory and Internet Community Centre (CLICC) and the Tablet for Schools (TFS) programs,” Mrs Waki explained.

“The computer lab on Gambule school is part of the CLICC program and the model could be replicated in other schools in the country.”

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